Baystate Providers Offer Healthy Tips for 2024

Off on the Right Foot

 

Did you include better health in your New Year’s resolutions?

Health experts at Baystate Health suggest setting realistic goals and prioritizing what is most important to you, taking small steps, and remembering not to beat yourself up if you encounter a setback in your health goals for 2024. Here are three goals to consider as you continue on your journey:

 

Improve Your Blood Sugars

From Dr. Cecilia Lozier, chief of the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Baystate Health:

There are three important approaches to improve your blood-sugar numbers as we start the new year. First, moderate your carbohydrate intake. No dramatic approach is needed. If before you would take two scoops of potatoes, now consistently take one and fill the empty space with non-starchy vegetables.

Dr. Cecilia Lozier

Dr. Cecilia Lozier

“Moderate your carbohydrate intake. No dramatic approach is needed. If before you would take two scoops of potatoes, now consistently take one and fill the empty space with non-starchy vegetables.”

Second, increase your physical activity. Using your muscles will push sugar into your cells and out of your bloodstream. The more you move and are physically active, the better your numbers will look. Third, modest weight loss. Losing between 5% and 10% of your body weight will have a dramatic impact on how you metabolize sugar. Speak with your healthcare provider to personalize this approach for you.

 

Address Sleep Problems

From Dr. Karin Johnson, medical director, Baystate Health Regional Sleep Program and Baystate Medical Center Sleep Laboratory, Baystate Health:

Stress levels are higher today in the world we live in. While stress can make sleeping well more challenging, it is important to prioritize sleep, which is necessary for health and well-being. Most adults function best with seven to eight hours of sleep, and

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The CEO of a skincare startup shares the weekly workout routine that helps him manage stress and unplug

In our CEO wellness series, we ask executives about their day-to-day habits to gain insight into the tactics they use to minimize stress and maintain their well-being.

More from Fortune:  5 side hustles where you may earn over $20,000 per year—all while working from home Looking to make extra cash? This CD has a 5.15% APY right now Buying a house? Here’s how much to save This is how much money you need to earn annually to comfortably buy a $600,000 home 

Adam Ross is the CEO and co-founder of Heyday, the leading skincare services brand that offers 50-minute personalized facials, progressive products and professional guidance. In 2015, Ross launched the first shop in Manhattan’s NoHo neighborhood, and now Heyday is the fastest-growing skincare services brand in the U.S., with over 10 company-owned and franchise locations across the country.

Coffee or tea? And what do you put in it? 
In the morning, two cups of Bulletproof coffee with oat milk. It’s the best way to start the day.

What is your go-to breakfast?
A shake with banana, frozen blueberries, some protein and almond milk. And a slice of toast with almond butter.

Tell us about your workout routine. 
I do a combination of weights, cardio and stretching. I work out 6 days per week and usually do a long walk on Sunday, which is technically my day off. Over time I’ve realized, like skincare, more isn’t necessarily better, when it comes to working out.

How many hours do you sleep on a typical night? 
7 hours. I’ve been making a conscious effort to sleep more. I use the Oura ring, which I love and really helps me stay on track. I also read Mathew Walker’s Book Why We Sleep, which I found profound. We all know more sleep

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Napping may boost creativity, study finds

output immediately afterward compared with remaining awake, a recent study found. Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com” alt=”Napping was linked to more creative output immediately afterward compared with remaining awake, a recent study found. Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com”/

Napping was linked to more creative output immediately afterward compared with remaining awake, a recent study found. Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

Lightbulb inventor Thomas Edison believed a little shuteye could boost his creativity. Contemporary scientists think the iconic innovator was on to something.

But timing is key, they say.

“We found a strong effect of ‘sleep onset’ on creativity,” said study author Kathleen Esfahany, an undergraduate student focusing on computer science and neuroscience at MIT.

Sleep onset, Esfahany explained, refers to the earliest stage of sleep, when people transition from a woozy but still awake state into sleep.

Also known as N1, sleep onset has long been credited — without much scientific proof — as having the power to gin up the creative juices.

In Edison’s case, when struggling with a problem, he would reportedly grip a metal ball in his hand just before falling asleep. The idea was to quickly awaken at the noise of its fall, in order to take advantage of a freshly liberated mind.

By the time of his death in 1931 — and perhaps in part due to those inspirational catnaps — he acquired 1,093 patents.

For this new research, investigators set out to answer two main questions: Does napping indeed supercharge creativity, and can that nap-induced creativity be shaped and enhanced by adding audio-guided suggestions?

The experiment made use of a hand-worn device called “Dormio,” which the team developed during prior research.

Fashioned as a high-tech glove, the device assesses three markers of sleep onset: muscle tone shifts, heart rate and arousal status as measured by skin-based electrical activity (skin conductance). The

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