Wake Forest regenerative medicine research set for ISS

Taking the development of local regenerative medicine research into outer space is set to become a reality this month.

Axiom Space, which is developing the first commercial space station, and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine said Monday they will sent the first bioprinted solid tissue constructs to the International Space Station.

According to Cellink.com, bioprinting “is an additive manufacturing process similar to 3D printing, using a digital file as a blueprint to print an object layer by layer.”

“But unlike 3D printing, bioprinters print with cells and biomaterials, creating organ-like structures that let living cells multiply. Although bioprinting is a relatively new technology, it has huge potential to benefit industries like regenerative and personalized medicine, drug discovery and cosmetics.”

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Axiom will pilot the all-private astronaut mission Ax-2 to the low-orbit ISS. The mission will be launched from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center.

The groups said the crew will conduct extensive scientific research experiments, including WFIRM’s vascularized research involving liver and kidney tissue constructs.

The tissues will be studied for 10 days to evaluate the vascularization of thick tissue in microgravity, as well as the effectiveness of this platform technology for other tissue types.

“This launch marks an important next step for our regenerative medicine research related to vascularized tissue,” WFIRM Director Dr. Anthony Atala said in a statement.

“This is an opportunity to develop an interim or early step toward creating solid tissues/partial organs for transplantation into patients in the future to address the organ shortage.”

Core details

The research is among the first fruits of the collaboration between WFIRM and Axiom that was announced in April 2022.

WFIRM officials have described the partnership as the “next frontier” in research and manufacturing.

Previous research on the ISS using cells in low-Earth orbit has included both

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Which Socks to Wear for Each Workout

Change Up Your Workout Socks For the Ultimate Support

<p>Getty images / Westend61</p> Women lacing up her shoes for a workout

Getty images / Westend61

Women lacing up her shoes for a workout

Reviewed by Michele Stanten, ACE-GFI

As part of your getting-ready routine in the morning, chances are slipping into socks falls somewhere in the mix—and this is especially true if you’re an avid exerciser. Working out without socks can be super uncomfortable for most activities, as bare feet in sneakers can exacerbate sweating, chafing, and even lead to the formation of pesky blisters that can hinder your future workouts. Socks also make your feet feel more comfortable while you’re working out, which can motivate you to exercise harder and for longer periods of time.

“The feet have the second-most concentration of nerve endings in the body aside from the hands, which means that the feedback of information from the feet to the nervous system is essential in determining how we move,” explains Marvin Nixon, MS, NBC-HWC, CPT, certified nutrition consultant, and health and wellness coach. “Wearing socks allows more information to flow from the ground to the brain and helps create powerful movement decisions and better balance and stability while providing protection to the feet.” While you may think being barefoot provides optimal sensory feedback, there is some research that shows compression socks have a similar effect.

Here is what you need to know about different types of socks, their benefits, and how to select the right socks for your workout.

Different Types of Socks and Their Benefits

Of course, socks come in all shapes, sizes, fabrics, and styles. Just like it’s important to choose the right shoe for your specific workout, it can pay to be smart about which type of sock you wear. Here’s a look at the different types of socks out there—and the benefit they

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UCSF study shows health complications due to post-Roe abortion laws

A new report has identified dozens of examples in which medical providers say pregnant patients received care in the past year that deviated from care they would have received before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade — a sign, researchers said, of a pattern of serious health complications triggered by abortion bans.

While no nationwide data has yet emerged to show the extent of these complications, the report, being released Tuesday by researchers at the University of California San Francisco and shared with The Washington Post, offers a first-of-its-kind summary of anonymized examples from medical providers across the country.

The two research groups that conducted the report — UCSF’s Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health and the Texas Policy Evaluation Project at the University of Texas at Austin — support abortion rights.

Individual cases of health complications related to abortion bans have emerged since the June ruling, including stories of women turned away from hospitals with life-threatening pregnancy conditions as doctors and hospital administrators fear the legal risk that could come with terminating even a pregnancy that could jeopardize the mother’s well-being. But the new report, which listed 50 examples shared by providers who chose to participate in a national survey, represented an effort to capture a more expansive picture of how health care has been affected by abortion bans.

Patients “are being harmed in significant ways because care is being denied or delayed,” said Daniel Grossman, a professor at UCSF and the lead author of the report. “These laws are having a broader impact beyond people who are seeking abortion because they have an undesired pregnancy.”

Two friends were denied care after Florida banned abortion. One almost died.

The findings include examples of one patient who developed a severe infection after she

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What Is a Lazy Keto Diet? Is It Better Than Keto?

Photo Illustration by Amelia Manley for Verywell Health; Getty Images

Photo Illustration by Amelia Manley for Verywell Health; Getty Images

  • A new report ranked keto as one of the worst diets for heart health due to an increased risk of nutrient deficiencies.

  • The traditional keto diet promotes strict adherence to eating high amounts of fat, moderate amounts of protein, and very low carbs.

  • An alternative “lazy keto” eating pattern may be a more sustainable option and only requires tracking carb intake.

Following the ketogenic diet, or “keto,” means tracking macronutrients and some people don’t want to worry about counting every single gram of fat, protein, and carbohydrate they eat. “Lazy keto” emerged as an easier way to maintain the keto lifestyle because it only requires carb counting.

The r/lazyketo subreddit, which has 5,500 members, says this is for people who want “subscribe to the Keto diet, but really don’t want to put the work into it.” A quick scroll through #lazyketo on TikTok shows videos of creators sharing keto hacks, meal plans, and recipes that wouldn’t fit in a traditional keto plan.

Keto was originally developed in 1920 as a way to help children with epilepsy when medications failed. The diet took off as a weight loss tool in the 1990s and it’s still very popular to date—just walk down the aisle of any health food store and you’ll see the keto buzzword plastered on everything from tortillas to ice cream.

But in the long run, it’s hard to adhere to the keto diet, according to Shivam Joshi, MD, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at New York University Grossman School of Medicine.

Related:Study: Keto Diet May Lead to Long-Term Health Risks

“There are high dropout rates in studies lasting longer than six months, which is due to how difficult it is to stay in ketosis and

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Treating children’s fever with medicine

The Woman’s Doctor: When to treat children’s fever with medicine



AND FEVERS, WHEN YOUR CHILD HAS ONE, YOU MAY PANIC AND RUN FOR MEDICINE, BUT IS IT REALLY NECESSARY? ACCORDING TO A NATIONAL POLL FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 IN 3 PARENTS WILL GIVE FEVER, REDUCING MEDICATION FOR SPIKED TEMPERATURES BELOW 100.4, WHICH ISN’T RECOMMENDED. DR. EMILY WISNIEWSKI, A PEDIATRICIAN IN MERCY AT MERCY MEDICAL CENTER, SAYS IT’S IMPORTANT TO NOTE YOUR BODY GETS A FEVER IN ORDER TO FIGHT OFF A VIRUS OR BACTERIA. SO WELCOME TO THANKS FOR JOINING US THIS MORNING, DOC. WE KNOW FEVERS ARE AN INDICATION THAT SOMETHING’S WRONG, BUT WHEN SHOULD IT BECOME WORRISOME? WHEN SHOULD WE REACH FOR THAT MEDICATION? YEAH. SO IN GENERAL, A FEVER IS ANYTHING WITH A TEMPERATURE ABOVE 104 LIKE YOU HAD MENTIONED. IF YOU HAVE A CHILD WHO HAS A TEMPERATURE HIGHER THAN THAT, IT’S COMPLETELY OKAY TO REACH FOR THAT MEDICATION. BUT HONESTLY, IF YOU HAVE A KID WHO’S JUST NOT FEELING WELL, IS GRUMPY, IT’S ALSO OKAY THAT GIVE THEM SOME MEDICATION AS WELL. AND THEN WHAT ABOUT IF IT’S MAYBE A LOW GRADE FEVER, BUT IT’S A SUSTAINED FEVER? YEAH. SO WE WORRIED ABOUT FEVERS THAT LASTS MORE THAN 4 OR 5 DAYS. SO IF YOU ARE SEEING THAT LENGTH OF FEVER, THAT KID NEEDS TO BE CHECKED OUT. I WAS GOING TO SAY, BECAUSE MANY TIMES IF A KID HAS A FEVER, PARENTS WILL GIVE THEM MEDICINE AND SAY, HEY, LOOK, I DON’T THINK WE NEED TO GO TO THE URGENT CARE OR THE E.R. OR CALL THE DOCTOR YET. BUT WHEN DOES IT GET TO THAT POINT THAT YOU SHOULD WORRY? YEAH. SO LIKE I SAID, THE LENGTH OF FEVER IS

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Trainers Never Start A Workout Without One Of These Moves

dynamic stretching exercises

12 Dynamic Stretches To Start Your Workout StrongHearst Owned

I used to roll my eyes at any pre-workout stretch. Little did I know, skipping those moves was holding me back. Dynamic stretching before a sweat sesh is key for optimizing performance, reducing the risk of injury, and preparing muscles for maximum efficiency.

“Dynamic stretching is an active form of stretching where your muscles and joints move through your full range of motion,” says Jessica Chellsen, DPT, CSCS, physical therapist and founder of Vibrant Coast Physical Therapy & Wellness. “It incorporates whole body movements rather than just one muscle group and uses similar movement patterns as the sport or workout you are going to perform,” she explains.

Meet the experts:

Jessica Chellsen, DPT, CSCS, is a doctor of physical therapy, certified strength and conditioning specialist, and founder of Vibrant Coast Physical Therapy & Wellness.

Kendall Green, DPT, CSCS, is a doctor of physical therapy and certified strength and conditioning specialist at Myodetox.

Joseph Bryan Lipana, DPT, CSCS, is a doctor of physical therapy, certified strength and conditioning specialist, and owner of FYZICAL Punta Gorda.

Basically, performing dynamic stretches before a workout sets you up for success. They elevate your heart rate and warm your muscles in preparation for the activity, which is crucial for injury prevention, Chellsen adds.

Another bonus? Dynamic stretching is an excellent way to break up the workday. “If we spend many hours in a fixed position, like when sitting at a computer or driving to work, we may become prone to staying in that fixed position and lose the ability to move through the entire range of motion,” says Kendall Green, DPT, CSCS, a physical therapist at Myodetox. “Taking micro breaks and performing dynamic movements every 12 hours

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Methylene chloride paint stripper killed their kids. They fought back.

Kevin Hartley with his dog, Chevelle. He died at 21 in 2017 while refinishing a bathtub with a methylene chloride product.

This story was published in partnership with theCenter for Public Integrity, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates inequality.

A bathtub. A floor. A bike. The items Kevin Hartley, Drew Wynne and Joshua Atkins had been working on at the time of their deaths less than 10 months apart varied, but what cut their lives short was the same: a chemical in paint strippers and other products sold in stores nationwide.

In their grief and horror, their families vowed to fight like heck to keep methylene chloride from killing again.

Get it off the shelves. Ban it. 

But in the U.S., with its checkered history of weak worker and consumer protections, astonishingly few chemicals have ever met that fate. That’s how methylene chloride became a serial killer despite warnings of its fumes’ dangers before Hartley, Wynne and Atkins had even been born. No agency intervened as it struck down dozens of people — if not more — in recent decades. 

After a Center for Public Integrity investigation and pleas from safety advocates, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finally proposed to largely ban it in paint strippers.

That was January 2017, the final days of the Obama administration. Hartley died that April, Wynne in October of that year and Atkins the following February amid the deregulatory fervor of the Trump administration, which wanted to dump rules rather than add them — especially at the EPA. The methylene chloride proposal was going nowhere.   

The three men’s mothers and other relatives had a seemingly impossible task ahead of them.

And yet, 13 months after Atkins’ death, the under-pressure Trump EPA acted to stop retail sales of paint strippers with methylene chloride. And in April, the Biden EPA proposed a rule to ban the chemical in all

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30-Day Smoothie Plan for the Mediterranean Diet

Clara Gonzalez

Clara Gonzalez

Reviewed by Dietitian Jessica Ball, M.S., RD

The Mediterranean diet, one of the healthiest eating patterns around, can be easy and delicious to follow. This 30-day smoothie plan can help you make simple and healthy choices to start each morning this month. Each smoothie is packed with various fruit and vegetables alongside plant-based protein sources, so they will fit well into a balanced eating pattern. Recipes like our Strawberry-Banana Green Smoothie and Mixed-Berry Breakfast Smoothie nutritious, refreshing and can help keep you fueled for the day ahead.

Strawberry-Banana Green Smoothie

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This green smoothie recipe is sweetened only with fruit and gets an extra dose of healthy omega-3s from flaxseeds.

Fruit & Yogurt Smoothie

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This easy fruit smoothie recipe calls for just three ingredients: yogurt, fruit juice and frozen fruit. Mix up your fruit combinations from day to day for a healthy breakfast or snack that never gets boring.

Chocolate-Banana Protein Smoothie

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Red lentils give this smoothie a plant-based protein boost. To make this smoothie vegan, try using unsweetened coconut beverage or almond milk in place of the dairy milk.

Kale & Apple Smoothie

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Casey Barber

Casey Barber

Apple slices and nut butter are a favorite after-school snack, and they taste just as satisfying in this smoothie. Pick your favorite nut butter: cashew for a less-prominent nutty flavor, or almond or peanut butter for a stronger taste.

Mixed-Berry Breakfast Smoothie

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Clara Gonzalez

Clara Gonzalez

Smoothies are popular for breakfast, but many don’t have enough calories or nutrients to be considered a complete meal. This creamy berry smoothie has the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat, and will keep you satisfied until your next meal.

Vegan Smoothie Bowl

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Eat this thick and creamy smoothie

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CMUH Smart Medicine System Assisted the ARDS Specialist Team Successfully Reversed the Patient’s Critical Condition

TAICHUNG,Taiwan, May 15, 2023 /PRNewswire/ — After the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, most people suffered from mild disease, and “Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)” is common for those critical COVID-19 patients. The 46-year-old of Ms. Chang, who had hypertension and nephropathy, accepted kidney transplantation surgery 10 years ago. She was tested positive for COVID-19 and had severe respiratory failure. Ms. Chang was diagnosed to have “Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).” At the negative pressure isolation ICU of China Medical University Hospital (CMUH), Ms. Chang immediately underwent endotracheal intubation, and ECMO emergent use was initiated to temporarily replace the lung function of Ms. Chang. Thanks to the visualized smart medicine system designed by CMUH to real-time monitor Ms. Chang’s key respiratory therapy. Further, given proper antibiotics and antivirals to the patient, the condition of Ms. Chang was reversed and improved with 15 days of ECMO support. On the 23rd day, the endotracheal tube was removed, and Ms. Chang was getting stable and successfully recovered to be discharged after 35 days of hospitalization.

“CMUH Smart medicine system: ARDS real-time monitoring dashboard” ensured Ms. Chang’s “LPV,” the green zone meant the safety range of the lung volume during the acute phase for patient’s lung protection.

ARDS Needs Timely “LPV”  Smart Medicine System Can Help Reduce the Mortality Rate of Critical Patients

Dr. Wei-Cheng Chen, V.S., Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, CMUH , stated that according to Ms. Chang’s acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score when first admitted to the isolated ICU, the predicted mortality rate was 70%; however, the medical care team accurately provided the Tidal Volume (TV) to protect the lungs from injury through the assistance of the smart medicine system. Furthermore, an interprofessional and cross-department “ARDS team” was gathered right away to save Ms. Chang with all their combined efforts, including physicians from pulmonary and critical care medicine, renal transplantation, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular surgery, nurse specialists, the respiratory technicians, technicians of extracorporeal technician, pharmacists, and

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Lakeland YMCA expansion wins commission approval; includes hardening for security

The Lakeland Family YMCA moves one step closer to expanding its campus by building a 41,000-square-foot field house and 4,000-square-foot childcare extension.

The Lakeland Family YMCA moves one step closer to expanding its campus by building a 41,000-square-foot field house and 4,000-square-foot childcare extension.

LAKELAND — The Lakeland Family YMCA has cleared its first legal hurdle to adding a nearly 41,000-square-foot fieldhouse expansion.

Lakeland commissioners voted unanimously to approve a major modification in the YMCA’s Planned Unit Development to allow for construction of a fieldhouse building, renovations and expansion of its existing child care facilities. The estimated $21 million project will improve overall safety and increase capacity of the YMCA’s programs.

“Our child care building in the back is not safe,” said Elaine Thompson, CEO of YMCA West Central Florida. “As in elementary schools right now, we are not safe for active shooters.”

YMCA growth: Lakeland Family YMCA looks to expand facility along Cleveland Heights Blvd.

Capital Costs: Lakeland Family YMCA offers new details, begins capital campaign for $21 million expansion

Thompson said the child care building will be renovated to include all the protections parents might expect to see at local schools, like Carlton Palmore Elementary School on the other side of Cleveland Heights Boulevard. It will be expanded by approximately 4,000 square feet, to increase the capacity of the Y’s child care program from 242 children to about 400, with the final limit to be determined by Florida’s Department of Children and Families.

With its existing facilities, the YMCA’s youth sports programs have been “maxed out,” Thompson said. The youth sports programs have more than 400 children enrolled every session with no room for additional basketball or indoor soccer, she said. Thompson hopes to be able to double that to about 800 children during summer camps once the child care expansion and new fieldhouse are completed.

“We’d be really able to do so much more for the children for

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